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Another why question...

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'Another why question...'
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nelson's user image
nelson
22.01.2003 - 07:57
forum administrator
...although this is more sticky.

Why don't severed limbs/fingers/ears/brains grow back? After all, bones mend themselves and loosing a bit of skin or even some muscle tissue in small amounts is quickly replaced...
richard's user image
richard
22.01.2003 - 10:24
forum administrator
Well I'm not speaking with any degree of expertise on this subject, but it's one thing to mend a bone than it is to create a new one from scratch.

I'd be very surprised if someone could live for long enough without a brain for it to grow back...

As for ears - who knows?

I think it would be better if we could transplant our brains into 'terminator' skeletons, as they'd be much better :o)
deathjester's user image
deathjester
22.01.2003 - 15:12
forum administrator
i think the question is more this:

"how does ur body know that peices are missing.."

u see what im gettign at ?
nelson's user image
nelson
23.01.2003 - 18:35
forum administrator
Yeah, well, how does your body know what pieces to grow when you're a bunch of cells in the first place? If it has that information, I don't see why it would be such a huge leap forward to regrow, say, a finger.

Yes, missing a brain might impair most people from full recovery...
martyncolebrook's user image
martyncolebrook
24.02.2003 - 23:06
Not sure about impair, most of the 1st year students seem to manage perfectly well.


(immediately hides before shouts of 'cynic' come his way)
deathjester's user image
deathjester
25.02.2003 - 03:12
forum administrator
no, seriously- how does the bosdy know when its grown ?


ive been askign that since my grandad told me what a cell was, and thusfar i think the answer to that one still illudes the human race.

larf.
richard's user image
richard
25.02.2003 - 09:37
forum administrator
Once cells have divided a given number of times in the growing process, the telomeres at the end of the DNA strands (which get shorter during the duplication process) lose the ability to manufacture the 'growth' hormone.
deathjester's user image
deathjester
25.02.2003 - 21:30
forum administrator
nice job- how coem my flamign A level bio teacher couldnt tell me that ?

one missing piece:
how does it know to 'slow down' or 'speed up' the growth of hair dependign on its current length....
richard's user image
richard
25.02.2003 - 22:04
forum administrator
I'm pretty certain it's a myth that hair grows faster if it's been cut (I presume that's what you were referring to?). If not, then I couldn't even hazard a guess, since hair is just a tube of dead cells, how could they pass back any kind of information?
richard's user image
richard
25.02.2003 - 22:08
forum administrator
Read this if you're that interested!
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